Arts + Culture

And just like that, the moratorium lifts: Artmosphere is now a bar

▸ The gist: It’s been a long and strange journey, but Artmosphere’s regulatory limbo is now over. The council voted to allow the popular Downtown venue to operate as a bar rather than a restaurant.

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▸ Some background: Artmosphere, in a sense, is the poster child for Downtown’s tribulations associated with a 15-year-old moratorium on new bars in the district. The venue has operated for years on a restaurant’s liquor license, running afoul of regulations that require a restaurant’s food to make up more than 50 percent of its sales. Recently, Downtown officials and advocates have lobbied for an end to the moratorium, which they say created a monopoly for existing bars and grossly distorted the real estate market.

▸ “Have we now lifted the moratorium on bars Downtown?” Councilman William Theriot asked Mayor Joel Robideaux from across the council’s crescent desk. “Certainly, I would say the moratorium was lifted at a previous council meeting,” the mayor replied, indicating the official end of the practice was the creation of the conditional use permit itself.

▸ Can you spell C-U-P? In his interrogative with the mayor, Theriot referred to the new permit class as a “cup,” as in something you drink out of. Opening a new bar Downtown? Now you need to go to the city and get a cup.

▸ What to watch for: Yes, this is the visible end of the moratorium, but it’s hardly an opening of the flood gates. Artmosphere’s case continues to illustrate the effort required to crack the still-standing limitations on new bar licenses Downtown. Councilman Pat Lewis, who in May voted against putting the permit up for a final vote, amended the permit to stipulate that, among other things, Artmosphere must serve food when operating and must operate five days a week.

“I congratulate her for being persistent. She was very persistent,” Lewis said at the meeting. “You can ask the owner. I made it very difficult for her. It’s not just a rubber stamp.”

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A customer at the Popeye's buffet line

We’ll never let go: our obsession with the last Popeyes buffet

It’s the last of its kind. A local love turned national legend. More importantly, Lafayette’s Popeyes buffet is the fabric of our lives.

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How I learned to stop worrying and love the Jeopardy! buzzer

Contributor Rex Moroux — realtor by day, raconteur by night — relives the anguish and near triumph of his bout with the buzzer on Jeopardy!

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Death to comfort zones Joel Greene III of Bridge Ministries of Acadiana says family is what you make it.

A “product” of Four Corners, Joel Greene III says family is what you make it. Through her work as director of Bridge Ministries of Acadiana, she’s building a big one.

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Lynda Frese: A figure in the natural world

Exploring the meaning of sacred space

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Junior League members gather in front of the future site of the Hilliard University Art Museum

Celebrating the Junior League of Lafayette The original angel investors

Take a minute to think about where you go when you want to experience art in Lafayette. Where do you bring your children to spark their creativity? Chances are, the Junior League had a hand in creating it.

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Will this Downtown venue fill the rock and roll gap? A new club takes a stab at restoring Lafayette's lost tour stop glory.

The Pearl, a planned venue affiliated with New Orleans music house One Eyed Jacks, will open Downtown this spring, the third stage announced or opened in the district in the last year.

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A Zydeco Heiress Sandra Davis of the Broussard Sisters Juré explains why tradition matters.

Sandra Davis of the Broussard Sisters Juré explains why tradition matters.

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Finding Magic In Kolkata

Author Shome Dasgupta’s latest collection of short stories hearkens to the slum-world surrealism of Gabriel García Márquez. Kolkata is Dasgupta’s Columbia.

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Fiction: Samosa

The following story appears in Anklet and Other Stories, a collection of short fiction by Lafayette-based author Shome Dasgupta published in 2017.

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The Gopsel According To Jane Jacobs

What communities like Lafayette have learned about city building from the pioneering urbanist.

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Not Far From The Tree

I told Greg Guirard I wanted my table to rise from the swamp. I wanted creatures to delight my grandchildren. I wanted art.

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