News + Notes

We asked Judge Jules Edwards about his bid for City Court Judge. Here’s what he said.

We don’t ask the questions. You do.

This election season, we’re hosting reader Q&A’s with local candidates on the November ballot in a digital town hall format. Each session connects readers with candidates for conversation about the issues that matter most to them.

Check out our Election Guide for more resources and candidate info.

Learn more about Jules Edwards and his platform using the links below.

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about yourself? 

Judge Edwards: I am a state trial court judge who has presided in Division B of the 15th Judicial District Court for 27-years, and I have 30-years of Military Experience. I enlisted as a Private in the USMCR and finished my military career as a Colonel in the LAARNG.  I am married, and we have three wonderful and accomplished adult children and a delightful daughter-in-law. I am a candidate for Division A of the Lafayette City Court and I want to bring evidence-based practices to the City Court to improve the quality of life in Lafayette.

Q: Some people might think of City Court as a place to pay traffic fines. How can you “improve quality of life” with a seat on the City Court bench? 

Judge Edwards: The Lafayette City Court is much more than a place to pay traffic fines. The Lafayette City Court is a fully functional trial court. The Lafayette City Court is however a court of limited jurisdiction because that court lacks the authority to try jury trials, felony cases, misdemeanor cases with penalties greater than 6-months in the parish jail, and civil cases involving damages greater than $20,000.

The Lafayette City Court can try traffic civil, criminal misdemeanor, juvenile delinquency, child in need of care, and families in need of services cases. Each of these types of disputes have a significant effect on the quality of life in the City of Lafayette.   A judge who has the required knowledge, skills, and ability to resolves these disputes can dramatically increase the sense of peace and security experienced in the city.

However, a judge who can show people how to resolve their disputes prior to coming to court, can inspire residents and visitors to truly love their neighbors and give the other that which is due to that other, render aid to the widows and orphan, the victims of domestic violence without waiting for the government to use taxpayer dollars to accomplish those things, is the kind of judge who can render a great service to the city. I am #88 on the ballot, and I am asking for an opportunity to be that kind of judge.